Table of contents:

Good arguments for a second-hand home
Good arguments for a second-hand home

Video: Good arguments for a second-hand home

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: 3 Questions to Ask Before Buying Second Home | Real Estate Investment, Good or Bad? 2023, February
Anonim

The dream of owning a home is often easier to fulfill with a used property. It is in the hands of buyers to minimize possible risks.

Table of contents Table of contents Good arguments for a second-hand home

  • Better look closely
  • Modernize in stages
  • Check the building services
  • Improve negotiation base
  • Expert advice: How the building authority helps
  • 7 typical defects in old buildings

Table of contents Table of contents Good arguments for a second-hand home

  • Better look closely
  • Modernize in stages
  • Check the building services
  • Improve negotiation base
  • Expert advice: How the building authority helps
  • 7 typical defects in old buildings

An old building suits many. Anyone who buys an existing property will see immediately what they are getting: the room layout, architecture and building materials already give a good impression of the living environment. Older buildings are often in sought-after locations with mature infrastructure. No wonder that many choose a second-hand home. The often decisive plus point of used houses and apartments is their price: Existing properties are generally significantly cheaper than comparable new properties. Depending on the region and type of property, the difference can be up to 40 percent.

Better look closely

On the other hand, the purchase of an old building involves increased effort. "Before you buy an older house, it is important to check the condition of the building carefully, " says Julia Wagner, legal adviser at the owner association Haus & Grund Deutschland eV. Often one speaks of “bought as seen”. As a result, the seller is not liable for obvious defects, i.e. those that a prospect could recognize during a thorough inspection of the property. Buyers who have overlooked damp walls or mold, for example, can neither withdraw from the notarial contract of sale nor request the seller to remedy the defect. "The seller generally only has to pay compensation if he knows hidden defects and maliciously conceals them from the buyer, " explains lawyer Wagner. In order not to experience any nasty surprises, prospective buyers should plan enough time to view the property and it is best to take along a knowledgeable adviser.

Modernize in stages

Brush the walls for a moment and then move in with the sack and pack? If only minor cosmetic repairs are required, used properties are ready to move into immediately. This is also an advantage over new buildings, which many buyers of existing properties appreciate. Desired modernization measures can sometimes be carried out in peace after moving in and in stages. "Before you buy, however, you should already assess which measures are pending and what they will cost, " Wagner recommends. This can be assisted by a building surveyor, whom, for example, the owner associations provide. Interested parties also receive expert information from craftsmen and architects.

Check the building services

Typical weak points in older buildings are, for example, basements, roofs, electricity and water pipes and windows. The structural and energetic condition does not necessarily depend on the age of a property. A well-maintained house from the Wilhelminian period can be in better condition than a ramshackle 70s building. What buyers of existing properties have to reckon with in the medium term is the renewal of the heating system. A boiler typically has a maximum lifespan of 30 years. In most cases, it is worth switching to a more modern model straight away, because this also significantly reduces energy costs. By law, property sellers are required to present an energy certificate for the building upon inspection. This helps prospective buyers to assess the energetic condition of the property. "But the document says nothing about the actual energy consumption of the future owners, " Wagner says. The heating costs also depend on the personal need for heat and the behavior of the residents.

Improve negotiation base

A real estate appraisal costs around 500 to 1, 000 euros. The investment not only saves the buyer from bad surprises. If you know the weaknesses of the property of your choice, you can also negotiate the price better.

Julia Wagner
Julia Wagner

Julia Wagner from Haus & Grund eV

Photo: Hoffotografen GmbH Berlin

Expert advice: How the building authority helps

Julia Wagner, Haus & Grund Germany eV:

"Whether double doors, stucco or simply high ceilings: old buildings have a special charm, even if the living comfort leaves something to be desired. If you fall in love with a time-honored house, you may already be imagining a stylish modernization. But before you sign the sales contract, you shouldn't just look at the costs of the planned measures. The legal framework is equally important: is a building permit required? Are the desired conversions allowed?

Make yourself known

Information can be obtained from the local building authority. If major conversions are planned, a look at the development plan can provide clarity. Many municipalities provide online access to their development plans. Research is then possible around the clock. However, these plans are not always self-explanatory for the layperson. However, the building authorities usually also have a citizens' consultation: you can call the office to clarify open questions, or you can personally present them there. Prospective buyers are best advised to bring the floor plan of their desired property. In a personal conversation, it can be quickly clarified which modernization measures can be implemented."

7 typical defects in old buildings

1. Damp basements: Until the 1970s, basement walls and foundations were often insufficiently protected against moisture.

2. Mold: The fungus is widespread in old buildings. On the other hand, it helps: remove cold bridges and dry walls.

3. Roof damage: uninsulated roofs drive up energy costs. Flat roofs could leak.

4. Pollutants: Asbestos was used until the 1970s. In the 80s, formaldehyde, tar-containing parquet glue and toxic wood preservatives were used.

5. Ailing lines: In old buildings, power lines can be laid without an earth cable. Leaky gas pipes and lead water pipes are possible.

6. Wind from the window: Aluminum windows from the 1970s often have cold bridges. Windows made of wood last around 50 years, with plastic around 15 to 25 years.

7. Obsolete heating: after 20 to 30 years a boiler is finished. Even if he is still doing his job: the energy consumption is usually too high.

Popular by topic