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Electric cars are turning your home into a gas station
Electric cars are turning your home into a gas station

Video: Electric cars are turning your home into a gas station

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Video: Will electric cars kill gas stations? 2023, February
Anonim

Real estate will grow together with movables. Not immediately, but the direction is clear: With electric mobility, which has been growing slowly so far, the house will become a gas station for the electric car. And soon the car will also become an energy store for inexpensive and environmentally friendly electricity for everyday life and family.

The electric car industry is still a delicate plant in Germany. Of more than 45 million cars in Germany, just 77, 000 are electric vehicles (as of the end of 2016). More than half of these are plug-in hybrids that still have an internal combustion engine on board. But diesel scandals, threatened driving bans and the environmental problems of many cities act as fertilizer for the growth of e-mobility. One thing is clear: our mobility is facing a major change, and you are well equipped with an electric car. Swiss Post has already started to switch to electric delivery vehicles. Other players in urban traffic follow. The offer of the car industry now includes several dozen electric cars. And the ranges are increasing: According to the manufacturer, Opels Ampera-e should travel over 500 kilometers without reloading. As a second car, the electric car is already competitive if it weren't for the high price of the batteries. On the other hand, the pure operating costs per kilometer are significantly lower than those of a vehicle with an internal combustion engine. This is also due to the fact that an electric car has far fewer components that require extensive maintenance. The engine is simple, a gearbox is not necessary, the exhaust and the injection pump are superfluous. This greatly simplifies maintenance.

Elektroauto BMW i3
Elektroauto BMW i3

Start photo gallery

Elektroauto e.GO Life
Elektroauto e.GO Life
Elektroauto VW ID Buzz Bulli
Elektroauto VW ID Buzz Bulli
Elektroauto e-Up VW
Elektroauto e-Up VW

12 Show all The most important electric cars on the market

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BMW i3: The Munich-based electric car is the pioneer on the German market, and comes with a contract for natural power on request

Max. Range: approx. 300 km *

Price: from 37, 550 euros *

* according to the manufacturer

Photo: manufacturer

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e.GO Life: Finally an affordable electric car - and also from Germany. However, there is no big German car manufacturer behind it, but a startup from Aachen. Series production from 2018

Max. Range: approx. 104 km *

Price: from 15, 900 euros *

* Manufacturer information

Photo: manufacturer

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ID Buzz Bulli from Volkswagen: tradition and modernity should be combined in the electric cult version of the VW Bulli. The first Bullli rolled off the assembly line in 1950, and the electric model is scheduled to go into series production in 2020.

Max. Range: up to 600 km *

Price: not yet known

* Manufacturer information

Photo: manufacturer

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Volkswagen e-Up: VW customers can use the e-Up to move electrically until the E-Bulli is in the dealership. VW only has to retrofit the price-performance ratio.

Max. Range: 80 to 160 km *

Price: 26, 900 euros *

* Manufacturer information

Photo: manufacturer

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Ioniq from Hyundai: The South Koreans also have alternative drive technologies in their range. The Ioniq is available with a purely electric motor, as a hybrid or plug-in hybrid.

Max. Range: 280 km *

Price: 33, 300 euros *

* Manufacturer information

Photo: manufacturer

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Soul EV from Kia: The South Koreans have had an electric car in their range since 2014. The charging sockets are hidden behind the Soul's grille.

Max. Range: 212 km *

Price: from 30, 790 euros *

* Manufacturer information

Photo: manufacturer

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Electric vehicle from Mitsubishi: The Japanese electric ball has been rolling on Europe's roads since 2010. Mitsubishi recently announced that it was planning to launch the major electric car attack together with Renault and Nissan.

Max. Range: 160km *

Price: 23, 790 euros *

* Manufacturer information

Photo: manufacturer

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Leaf from Nissan: In 2018, a new model of the world's best-selling electric car will be launched.

Max. Range: 378 km *

Price: 31, 950 euros *

* Manufacturer information

Photo: manufacturer

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Model 3 from Tesla: With the mid-range model, Tesla wants to move away from the pure luxury electric car. Equipped with semi-autonomous driving functions as standard.

Max. Range: 350 to 500 km *

Price: approx.40, 000 euros *

* Manufacturer information

Photo: manufacturer

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Ampera-e from Opel: In the shadow of the major German automobile brands plagued by diesel affairs, Opel won the “Ecobest 2016” award at the Paris Motor Show 2016 with the Ampera-e.

Max. Range: up to 520 km *

Price: from 39, 330 euros *

* according to the manufacturer

Photo: manufacturer

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Fortwo electriv drive from Smart: Finally, the Smart lives up to its name (and fulfills the original idea of ​​smart inventor Nicolas G. Hayek) and can run on an electric version.

Max. Range: 160 km *

Price: from 21, 940 euros *

* Manufacturer information

Photo: manufacturer

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Zoe from Renault: A major plus point of the Zoe is its fast charging time of just 1 hour at a home wallbox.

Max. Range: 240 km *

Price: 34, 700 euros *

* Manufacturer information

Photo: manufacturer

Elektroauto BMW i3
Elektroauto BMW i3
Elektroauto e.GO Life
Elektroauto e.GO Life
Elektroauto VW ID Buzz Bulli
Elektroauto VW ID Buzz Bulli
Elektroauto e-Up VW
Elektroauto e-Up VW
Elektroauto Hyundai Ioniq
Elektroauto Hyundai Ioniq
Elektroauto Kia Soul EV
Elektroauto Kia Soul EV
Elektroauto Mitsubishi Electric Vehicle
Elektroauto Mitsubishi Electric Vehicle
Elektroauto Nissan Leaf
Elektroauto Nissan Leaf
Elektroauto Tesla Model 3
Elektroauto Tesla Model 3
Elektroauto Opel Ampera-e
Elektroauto Opel Ampera-e
Elektroauto Smart Fortwo electric drive
Elektroauto Smart Fortwo electric drive
Elektroauto Renault Zoe
Elektroauto Renault Zoe

Cars park for 23 hours a day

The vast majority of drivers travel less than 40 kilometers a day. A car is on average for 23 hours. Enough time to load it comfortably. Similar to how we charge our mobile phones every day or two. But despite a purchase price of € 4, 000 for purely electric vehicles, sales are not satisfactory. The Electromobility Act (short: Emog), which came into force in 2015, wants to offer e-mobilists a few new incentives to make driving in cities more attractive. For example, drivers of electric cars should be able to park in city centers free of charge. So far, however, only a few cities such as Hamburg, Hanover or Stuttgart have implemented this.

Model country Norway

If you want to know how the development will go, you can look north: buyers of electric cars in Norway save a lot of taxes, including the 25 percent VAT. An electric VW Golf is cheaper there than the cheapest combustion engine. Electric vehicles regularly storm the front ranks of the national registration statistics. Four percent of the car fleet is already "Stromer". The Scandinavian country is the world leader in statistics. The infrastructure has been expanded accordingly. There are numerous privileges for drivers of electric vehicles: if their car is occupied by two or more people, they can use bus lanes. You don't pay tolls for bridges, tunnels or the city of Oslo. The capital city alone, with its 650, 000 inhabitants, has more than a thousand public charging stations. Electricity is often free of charge and 98 percent from renewable sources. In Berlin, which is six times larger, there are only half as many stops. This is typical of the infrastructure that is still very viable in Germany.

Karte mit Stromtankstellen für E-Autos
Karte mit Stromtankstellen für E-Autos

Electricity charging stations in Berlin: The public electromobility infrastructure is slowly growing in German cities, even if quick charging stations (orange symbols) are still very rare.

Photo: 2017 Geo-Basis-DE / BKG (© 2009), Google. Source: Open Charge Map

Timid e-steps in Germany

The number of public charging stations in Germany grew by a good quarter in 2016, and the federal government has launched a program worth millions to promote public stations. The operator “Tank und Rast” is currently building a quick-charging system on the motorways, which can refresh batteries properly during a coffee stop. A consortium in the automotive industry is also planning a network of high-performance charging stations. A number of employers offer charging stations for employees and company cars in their parking lots, as do several retailers. And a few communities are rushing forward. But there will still be a time until a comprehensive supply.

Ladestecker CCS Combo Standard Typ 2
Ladestecker CCS Combo Standard Typ 2

No matter what current: The charging plug CCS Combo Standard Type 2 becomes the uniform standard in Europe: suitable for alternating and direct current.

Photo: BMW Group

Problem: Long charging times for electric cars

Public charging only makes up ten to twenty percent of all charging. This brings us to the prerequisites and charging speeds for electric cars: The time it takes for an electric car to charge varies greatly, depending on the type of vehicle and battery and the performance of the charging station. If necessary, you can provide a medium-sized car with power for a range of ten kilometers from the household socket within one hour. For an almost complete load of a car in the compact class, this means charging times of ten to thirteen hours. With a wall charging station (or new German: Wallbox) this process is significantly shortened: four to six hours per charge are the norm. The car is fully fueled in the garage. A convenient solution. Only expensive DC charging stations charge much faster: it takes 30 minutes to fill most of the battery. Unfortunately, not all e-mobiles can be charged so quickly.

BMW in rot
BMW in rot

Customer parking: Some retailers have already set up charging stations for their customers. At Aldi Süd you can even charge for free for one hour.

Photo: Innogy

The smart home becomes a gas station

Those who have their own parking space have a privilege. Charging the car overnight at a lantern garage is not for everyone. Homeowners with sustainable electricity generation on their own roof have an even greater advantage. Thousands of houses in Germany already have photovoltaic systems. In connection with an electric vehicle, an interesting synergy effect is created for the smart home: If the sun shines and the PV system produces kilowatt hours, the energy for driving is free. It is precisely in this connection that industry sees an important topic of the future: BMW is developing complete solutions for an integrated system of smart home and car in cooperation with the heating manufacturer Viessmann. An important part of this are intelligent charging cables with built-in chips that can be programmed so that electricity only flows when the sun is shining. For homeowners without their own PV system, the smart cable can also be programmed to only charge when the electricity is cheap to have on the grid.

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Perfect garage: More than 80 percent of the owners of electric cars mostly charge their vehicles at home. Cheap if the electricity comes from the roof.

Photo: Innogy

The car as a power plant

Batteries from electric cars could also serve as a buffer to store solar energy and use it later, for example in the evening when the family is at home. Home and car are growing closer together. The fact that automobile manufacturers such as Mercedes-Benz or Tesla have been offering battery storage for electricity produced in-house for a long time shows the direction in which it will go. Such buffer stores could even make money in the future: As electricity production is increasingly relying on renewable electricity, capacity is needed to bridge the lull. The experts also favor the interplay of house battery storage at home and car batteries. A tip for those who find it too early for an electric car: anyone building or renovating a carport or garage should at least make the space fit for the future. Just like many housing companies and hotels do today: when renovating and building new buildings, power lines are already routed to the parking lots, even if no charging stations have yet been installed. This saves you the expensive retrofitting later. This could also be a model for far-sighted homeowners.

Carport mit Solarpanels
Carport mit Solarpanels

Self-sufficient: This carport can capture solar energy with its roof made of solar panels. This makes car owners completely energy self-sufficient at home.

Photo: BMW Group

Expert interview on e-mobility

The house asks Marcel Kritzer, product manager at innogy and responsible for electromobility. He regularly travels with a wide variety of electric cars.

The house: Mr. Kritzer, can you charge an electric car at a normal socket?

Marcel Kritzer: It is not recommended to regularly charge an electric car via a Schuko socket. In an emergency, you can do that. But a household network is not designed for continuous operation with such high performance. A wallbox is better.

What are the advantages of a wall box?

A wallbox charges an electric vehicle up to 11 kW of power. That is about five times faster than at the socket. It is also safer because a charging box has its own FI switch, a residual current circuit breaker. It immediately disconnects the network in the event of possible faults. The wallbox also communicates with the vehicle and always delivers exactly the power that the battery needs.

What are the requirements for a charging station at home?

None. A wall box can be connected both single-phase with 3.7 kW and three-phase with 11 kW. In any case, this must be done by an electrician who connects the box directly to the fuse box.

What does a wallbox cost?

At the moment the price is 678 euros.

Are there synergies with an in-house photovoltaic system?

In a modern PV system, the feed-in tariff is just over 12 cents per kilowatt hour. When I buy electricity, I usually pay more than double. It therefore makes economic sense to consume your own electricity from photovoltaics. It is also a CO2-free energy.

Can a car battery also serve as electricity storage for the PV system?

Technically, this is possible, and it is also tested regularly. But there are currently standards that prohibit the feeding back of electricity stored in this way into the general grid.

What would an ideal house system look like?

You can optimize a PV system with a stationary battery storage. It preserves the electricity produced during the day, so that the vehicle can be charged at night. A SmartHome system can then be used to specifically define large consumers that are to be operated from the battery storage.

Marcel Kritzer, Produktmanager bei innogy
Marcel Kritzer, Produktmanager bei innogy

Marcel Kritzer, product manager at innogy

Photo: Innogy

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