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Tacking tips: How to set staples correctly
Tacking tips: How to set staples correctly
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Tackers are no longer only used by upholsterers, furniture makers and do-it-yourselfers. With powerful compressed air staplers, carpenters and carpenters hammer in staples and nails much faster than would be possible with a conventional hammer. Another advantage: With the devices, you can also get to places that remain inaccessible with hammer and nail.

If you want to buy a tacker as a handyman or builder, you should know before you buy what work you need the tacker for and how hard and fast it has to strike. Carpenters, carpenters and roofers mostly work with compressor-driven compressed air nailers - they are by far the most powerful and are often used, for example, to fasten the roof battens to the rafters with nails. Do-it-yourselfers usually choose hand or electric staplers. Hand tackers drive wire clips into the wood up to a depth of 18 millimeters. If that is not enough for you, you can use the electric stapler: it creates clips up to 32 millimeters in length.

Buy a stapler: pay attention to good ergonomics

The tacker should be easy to release and should be comfortable to hold. If you push down the handle of the hand tacker, you should not be able to pinch your fingers. You can load universal staplers with nails as well as with different long and strong clamps - they are therefore usually supplied with two differently designed magazines. Make sure that the magazines can be opened, loaded and changed if necessary.

The so-called staple nose should be located on the outside of the staple as far as possible: This way, you can securely drive the staples or nails into corners and edges that are difficult to access - for example, into the underside of a profiled wood groove. Other types are also suitable for fastening electrical cables.

It is best to try out whether the desired tacker has the right clout before buying. There is a clear difference in performance, particularly on wood, depending on the hardness of the material. It is therefore best to bring a remnant of the type of wood for which you want to use your staple gun.

Handwerker tackert
Handwerker tackert

Tacking also makes roofing much easier: If you used to carefully nail in next to nail, you can now quickly staple a number of nails or staples.

Photo: MEV

Use staple stapler correctly

Textiles are fastened with fine wire clips - their broad backs hold many fabric threads and the fine wire does not damage the fabric. Flat wire staples with a wide back fix non-woven materials such as foils, aluminum laminations, cardboard and paper and do not let them tear out as quickly. Nails and narrow-back staples are used where the attachment should not be visible: on decorative strips, panels, but also on profiled boards for floors, walls and ceilings.

Staples for staplers come in different hardness, the so-called wire strength. From leg lengths of eight millimeters, use a harder wire that cannot bend when driving in. The following rule of thumb applies to the length of the clip: If you staple in hardwood, the clips should be twice as long as the thickness of the material you want to attach - three times as long on a softer surface. The following applies to every tacking: Put the device straight on and press it firmly onto the material before you press the trigger - this way you avoid that the clip is bent wrongly or incompletely. With every shot there is a setback that lifts the stapler off the material. The following applies: the heavier and stronger the tacker, the less pressure you have to exert. Over time, you develop the right feeling for it.

Before you start stapling, you should test the stapler on a test piece and carefully adjust the punch. Too little energy means that staples and nails do not sink completely into the material, excessive force leaves marks in the wood and, in extreme cases, can drive the staple completely through the material to be attached.

Different drives

  • Hand tackers (front) drive in clips with a spring that is preloaded by hand
  • Electric tackers (rear) have stronger springs that are preloaded using an electric motor
  • Pneumatic tackers are the quickest to hammer and develop the greatest impact
Verschiedene Tacker
Verschiedene Tacker

From back to front: electric tacker, compressed air tacker and hand tacker

Photo: Eyewire

Tack

Nails and narrow-back clips fasten strips, panels, slats and boards. Staples made of fine wire hold textiles, those made of flat wire, foil and paper.

Verschiedene Klammern
Verschiedene Klammern

The tacker ammunition: an overview of various nails and types of staples

Photo: Eyewire

Staple tip

Opposing tips jam the clamp in the material - but be careful: it can tear out close to the edge. Tips in the form of a chisel lead the ends vertically into the carrier material.

Klammerspitzen
Klammerspitzen

Clip with chisel tip (front), laterally pointed clip

Photo: Eyewire

Remover

It is best to pull out old or incorrectly inserted staples with a special staple lifter. An ergonomic, closed handle makes work easier and also protects your hands. In the event of an emergency, a thin slotted screwdriver will do the same - but be careful not to damage the workpiece when removing the clamp.

Entferner
Entferner

Device for removing staples

Photo: Eyewire

Ideal areas of application for staplers

  • Roof extension: Electric or compressed air staplers are particularly well suited for quickly attaching foils overhead - for example to attach a vapor barrier to the rafters. The purchase is worth it for this alone
  • Roofing: With a strong tacker, roof battens are fastened to the rafters in no time
  • Wall paneling: Using a stapler, the profiled wood claws are invisibly attached to the supporting structure with small nails
  • Floorboards: A strong compressed air tacker is ideal for attaching wooden floorboards to the supporting beams of the floor ceiling
  • New seat covers for furniture: plywood or chipboard can be quickly clad with new fabric: the fabric edges are simply tacked on the back

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