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Bricks
Bricks

Video: Bricks

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Bricks 2023, February
Anonim

A solid brick house - still a dream for many. No wonder, because bricks are particularly durable, create a natural indoor climate and score with good thermal insulation. But when building a house, the material not only has advantages, it also has disadvantages.

Table of Contents Table of Contents Building with Bricks: The Advantages and Disadvantages of the Material

  • Bricks: information about material, processing and costs
  • Clinker: Popular for building houses
  • Planned brick: systematic bricks
  • Thermal bricks: material with thermal insulation
  • Bricks or concrete: which material is more suitable for house building?
  • Limestone and pumice: alternatives to bricks?
  • Conclusion: a brick house is a good investment

Table of Contents Table of Contents Building with Bricks: The Advantages and Disadvantages of the Material

  • Bricks: information about material, processing and costs
  • Clinker: Popular for building houses
  • Planned brick: systematic bricks
  • Thermal bricks: material with thermal insulation
  • Bricks or concrete: which material is more suitable for house building?
  • Limestone and pumice: alternatives to bricks?
  • Conclusion: a brick house is a good investment

Bricks are very popular when building houses. However, their use has changed in recent centuries. The bricks were not only standardized, but also developed further. For example, traditional bricks are rarely used for exterior walls. However, that does not mean that you have to do without the classic design of a brick house. On the contrary: Modern bricks offer many advantages compared to concrete, sand-lime brick or lightweight building blocks such as pumice and can also be used well for energy-efficient construction methods. For example, thermal bricks or facing bricks are used. The popularity of clinker continues.

Bricks: information about material, processing and costs

1. Bricks and the Energy Saving Ordinance

Of course, compliance with the requirements of the Energy Saving Ordinance (EnEV) does not depend solely on the material you use for your walls. But the building envelope is a crucial factor. If you use simple bricks, you usually have to insulate to achieve the energy standards. How energy efficient the house will be later also depends on the wall thickness. You can usually do without additional thermal insulation if you use modern bricks - this means that even the energy standards of a passive house can be achieved.

Good to know: Funding, for example through the Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW), is also possible without problems for a brick house.

2. Process bricks yourself

Non-load-bearing walls and brick garden walls can also be hoisted by hobby craftsmen themselves. With load-bearing walls, you should better have experience or get help from a professional. On the one hand, the amount of mortar, plaster and wall must be precisely coordinated, on the other hand, the bricks must be laid neatly. If you do not work exactly here, you not only risk the walls collapsing, but also, for example, moisture damage. In both cases, the follow-up costs are not low.

3. Manufacture of bricks

Bricks are made of clay or clay. They are crushed and ground, then moistened and shaped. This is followed by drying and firing at 500 to 1, 800 degrees Celsius. Even after firing, bricks can be cut and sanded. If sawdust or paper shavings are mixed into the material, they burn in the oven. Fine pore structures are created. Strength, heat and sound insulation depend on the mixture of the material and the brick structure. Firing at particularly high temperatures, such as with clinker, causes the surface to melt. In this way, the brick becomes particularly pressure-resistant and resistant to water and frost. Face bricks are smoothed after firing. Finally, bricks with air chambers are filled with mineral fibers or pearlite, for example.

4. What are the dimensions of bricks?

Bricks are usually rectangular and are now standardized. When bricks were still made by hand, there was no uniform measure. However, a similar aspect ratio was used for monasteries, for example, so that monastery formats all had an approximate size of 28 x 15 x 9 centimeters, 30 x 14 x 10 centimeters or 30 x 14 x 12.5 centimeters. In 1872 the "Imperial Format" for bricks was introduced. This made it possible to use bricks from different manufacturers for the construction. The dimensions were 25 x 12 x 6.5 centimeters. The new imperial format was set at 24 x 11 x 6.3 centimeters. Today, the normal format (NF) corresponds to 24 x 11.5 x 7.1 cm, the thin format (DF) 24 x 11.5 x 5.2 cm.

5. Buy bricks

You can get simple bricks from around 40 cents each as perforated bricks. For solid bricks, on the other hand, you should plan at least one euro per piece. Clinker bricks, facing bricks and thermal bricks can cost up to four euros per brick. However, the dimensions of the bricks and the pallet size are important. Be sure to calculate your total needs in a first step so that you can better compare the costs. If you have no experience with this, you should consult an expert. Because errors creep in here quickly, which lead to unnecessary additional costs. Also keep in mind that shipping costs may apply.

Hausbau mit Ziegelsteinen
Hausbau mit Ziegelsteinen

Bricks have many advantages when building a house: The robust natural product is suitable for interior and exterior walls and contains no heavy metals.

Photo: iStock / filmfoto

Clinker: Popular for building houses

Clinker bricks give the house a particularly rustic and natural look. While you can hardly see other bricks under the plaster, clinker is mostly used as a visual highlight for external walls. Clinker has a high silicate content and is fired at around 1, 200 degrees Celsius. This closes the pores of the brick. This “sintering” ensures that clinker bricks can absorb less water. They are particularly resistant and defy rain and frost with ease. However, the thermal insulation of these bricks leaves something to be desired. As a facing brick, you can still conjure up a beautiful facade - in many different colors. On average, you can expect this brick to cost around 30 euros per square meter. Depending on the quality and appearance, it can also be a little cheaper or more expensive. Because clinker is so durable, you can sometimes buy used bricks, for example from specialized dealers or online marketplaces.

Tip: Take a look at sample panels in the specialty store before you buy, so that you can get an impression of the color and effect of the bricks.

Planned brick: systematic bricks

Face bricks are ground particularly smooth after firing and the chambers of the perforated bricks are filled with insulating material. This has the advantage that this brick usually does not need an additional layer of insulation even with single-shell wall constructions. Nevertheless, you can still meet the requirements of the Energy Saving Ordinance (EnEV). This is also due to the fact that the smooth facing tiles only require a thin mortar joint. This reduces the thermal conductivity of the masonry. You can save time by using thin-bed mortar or plastic glue. The surface also favors the absorption of plaster. Face bricks are somewhat more expensive than normal bricks, but are processed faster and more precisely.

Thermal bricks: material with thermal insulation

Thermo bricks also have air chambers that are filled with an insulating material, such as mineral wool. Therefore, these bricks are very suitable for single-layer walls, which should nevertheless meet the EnEV. Additional insulation is provided by the interior insulation. And natural moisture balance is also encouraged: thermal bricks absorb moisture, but gradually release it again. So moist air cannot build up in the walls. Another advantage of thermal bricks is that they are soundproof. Thermal bricks are more expensive to buy than normal bricks, but you also save yourself a double-skin outer wall. An energy-efficient brick house is easy to implement with thermal bricks.

Bricks or concrete: which material is more suitable for house building?

Classic bricks are rarely used for building houses these days. This is mainly due to their poor insulation properties. But concrete also has its disadvantages. Here you will find an overview of the most important properties of the two materials.

Bricks: advantages and disadvantages

You can use bricks for interior and exterior walls. They are long-lasting, comparatively hard and resistant. They are a natural product and contain no heavy metals and no fine dust. Classic bricks, however, require additional insulation in order to achieve the desired energy saving values. It is better to invest in modern bricks, which now have good thermal insulation. They also ensure safe fire protection and create a natural indoor climate.

Klinker
Klinker

Clinker ensures a rustic and natural style - a visual highlight for exterior walls.

Photo: iStock / LianeM

Concrete: advantages and disadvantages

With concrete you get good sound and fire protection when building a house. However, additional insulation is also required for this material. In addition, some components of concrete are not completely harmless. And: concrete should always be impregnated so that it does not break in frost. Aerated concrete is often used as a modern alternative to conventional concrete. Its characteristics:

  • AAC is particularly light.
  • It has very good thermal insulation.
  • Aerated concrete can be easily cut and glued.
  • Aerated concrete absorbs a great deal of moisture and not only has to be stored absolutely dry, but must also be plastered later for protection.

Limestone and pumice: alternatives to bricks?

Limestone and lightweight bricks such as pumice are also in competition with bricks when building houses. Sand-lime bricks are very environmentally friendly and offer particularly good sound insulation. Just like bricks, sand-lime bricks are very resilient and score in fire protection. However, the thermal insulation is less than that of bricks. Pumice has good thermal insulation values, but it does not store heat as well as bricks. Pumice bricks also stand out in terms of moisture. They dry faster, while pumice water stores for a relatively long time. Bricks are also more resistant than pumice stones and have a longer lifespan.

Conclusion: a brick house is a good investment

A brick house is particularly robust and resistant. Despite all the usual environmental influences, it has good static properties and is therefore particularly durable overall. Bricks also have a positive effect on the indoor climate and also prevent mold. Bricks are open to diffusion and absorb humidity without permanently storing them. The material is also environmentally friendly and can even be reused in some cases. With modern bricks you can meet the requirements of the EnEV and receive grants for house building. However, this requires a certain wall thickness. However, you don't pull up a brick house in a day. You have to plan a little time. But brick houses have a good price-performance ratio and can be designed exactly according to your wishes.

Anja Schmidt

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