Table of contents:

Marble: cost, use, cleaning
Marble: cost, use, cleaning

Video: Marble: cost, use, cleaning

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: How to clean the City 🕳 Marble Race 2023, February
Anonim

Hardly any other natural building material has such a luxurious look as marble. Noble, elegant and ideally suited to meet the needs of representation, marble has been used for more than 2, 000 years to build and furnish houses, cathedrals and palaces. But marble can do more than just tiles, floor slabs and window sills. The stone can be used in many different ways and is available in countless colors.

Table of Contents Table of Contents Marble: Timeless elegance for the whole house

  • What is marble?
  • What is the difference between marble and granite?
  • Where does marble come from?
  • What color is marble?
  • How much is marble?
  • How is marble used?
  • Clean marble - how it works

Table of Contents Table of Contents Marble: Timeless elegance for the whole house

  • What is marble?
  • What is the difference between marble and granite?
  • Where does marble come from?
  • What color is marble?
  • How much is marble?
  • How is marble used?
  • Clean marble - how it works

What is marble?

Marble is a natural stone made of calcium carbonate, also called carbonated lime in German. It sounds so unspectacular at first that you can't imagine that most of the Taj Mahal is made of white marble, right?

But the creation of marble is a true scientific adventure story that begins in the primeval oceans and demonstrates the power of nature: For many millions of years, dead coral reefs, shells and plants have slipped into the different layers of the earth bit by bit. Wherever the organic material with the three substances calcite, aragonite and dolomite came deep underground, i.e. close to the earth's core, it had to withstand extremely hot temperatures and enormous pressure and crystallized until it was marble.

In those places where the plants, mussels and corals slid less deeply into the earth, i.e. received less heat and pressure, the material crystallized less or not at all and is also more colorful. This younger natural stone is also called marble. Simply because it is also a nice-looking and polished limestone. Because: Linguists assume that the name marble comes from the Greek words "marmaros" ("boulder", "broken stone") and "marmeirein" ("shiny" or "shimmering"). Strictly speaking, this would mean that marble should only be called marble after it has been mined and polished.

So it can also be explained that a limestone that is mined in the Franconian Jura can also be called marble: the Jura marble, also called Treuchtlinger marble after its mining area.

What is the difference between marble and granite?

Granite is also a pure natural stone, which comes from the depths of the earth. However, it is not made of carbonate like marble, but of so-called igneous deep rocks called mica, feldspar and quartz. The origin of the word "granite" comes from Latin and means "grain".

From this we can already see that compared to the glossy polished, fine and filigree-looking marble, it is a coarse-grained, somewhat rough and visually less delicate stone. Usually a little darker and more patterned than marble - but not necessarily with less glitter, because granite can also shimmer and not too scarce.

Arbeitsplatte aus Granit
Arbeitsplatte aus Granit

In contrast to marble, granite is coarser and feels rougher.

Photo: living4media / Simon Maxwell Photography

Where does marble come from?

Marble is found in Germany (Baden-Württemberg, North Rhine-Westphalia, Bavaria and Hesse), Italy, Russia, France, India, Iran, Belgium, Greece, South Korea, Turkey, Brazil, Spain, China and Portugal. Depending on the country, or rather, depending on the geological conditions, the marble has different properties, i.e. a different degree of hardness, a different color, a different quality and also a different structure.

What color is marble?

Pure marble is white. Due to metal oxides in the earth, i.e. graphite, coal, bitumen and chlorite, the marble color can vary from brown, yellow, red and pink to gray and black to green. The same applies to the fine veins or spots that you see on the marble - the marbling of the natural stone that makes it so unique. One of the most famous types of black marble is called Nero Marquina and comes from Spain. The Jura marble can be classified in terms of color between light yellow and blue gray. It is also rich in fossils. This means that whole animals have been preserved in the Jura marble, which come to light when the natural stone is cut or polished. A famous example is the opera in Copenhagen. Cephalopods can be seen on the facade made of Jura marble.

Badezimmer aus Marmor
Badezimmer aus Marmor

Marble is a classic in the bathroom. It is available in many different colors: from brown to green to pink.

Photo: living4media / Meadow, Tom

How much is marble?

From around 50 euros per square meter you get real marble - most dealers have marble up to about 130 euros per square meter in the range. But of course there are even more expensive marble slabs. The marble price is not just about the purity or quality of the marble slab, it is also about how well the marble deposit can be reached, how much effort has to be taken to cut a marble block from the quarry and how far the marble quarry away from you. Up to 30 percent price difference is possible in the same mining area. The marble from Carrara (Italy), which has become known for its pure white and is particularly suitable for the production of statues, is therefore not always the most expensive marble.

The mining of marble is still a very complex and very dangerous job, despite all the technical advances. Human rights organizations ask if possible not to buy marble from countries known for their cheap wages. Because marble is still largely mined there under inhumane conditions.

How is marble used?

At the time of the Roman Empire, the use of marble was reserved for the rulers: endless colonnades, magnificent entrance halls, marble slabs in the dining room. Natural stone was also used in the construction of temples or later stairs, altar rooms, prayer grottos, pulpits or magnificent balcony railings in churches and cathedrals. Not to forget the impressive marble tombs and family tombs that shape the image of cemeteries.

Nowadays the noble material is accessible to almost everyone. There is no area in a house for which there is not at least one marble product: from the stylish marble washbasin for the private wellness oasis to the glossy flooring or the kitchen worktop, romantic marble seating and unusual flower pots for the garden to smaller ones Everyday objects such as lamps, mortars or saucers. In short: the white gold gives the daily routine that certain something.

Tischplatte aus Marmor
Tischplatte aus Marmor

A marble table top is not only robust, it also looks very classy.

Photo: living4media / EWAStock

The effect depends on the nature of the marble - and your creativity. Marble can look cool and cold, classically noble or very modern. Black marble tiles with underfloor heating underneath, for example, provide a stylish basis for a very modern bathroom. The material is also often used for table tops - in combination with wooden feet and matching wooden chairs, it is a timeless furnishing idea for the breakfast corner. Such a table can also be used as the basis for a chic washstand in the bathroom - modern square washbasins can be combined very well.

The marble classic in German households is likely to be the windowsill. While the manufacturers recommend sandstone, quartz, granite or slate for the outside area, the question of which material should be used for the window sills inside is very often answered with marble. Even without flowers and sculptures on it, marble window sills are a decoration for the room and create a sophisticated, timeless ambience.

By the way: Did you know that your toothpaste or your vitamin tablets could also contain marble? As an abrasive or as a calcium preparation.

Clean marble - how it works

Marble itself is a very durable material. However, as soon as it comes into contact with acid, it becomes dangerous for the calcareous product. Citrus, wine and vinegar, or other harsh acids, cause untreated marble to dissolve or have ugly, dull stains. Many marble products, especially those used in the kitchen or bathroom, are now protected with a special varnish. This is not without controversy, because for some it is too harmful to the environment, for others it does not provide adequate protection and a third party would prefer to cover everything with a plastic coating. One thing should be clear to you: if you choose a marble worktop or a marble sink, you will see signs of wear sooner or later. A fact that has long been accepted in countries like Italy and France.

You can delay the traces of time with the right care and cleaning:

1. Never clean with acidic cleaner! Home remedies such as vinegar cleaners and the like, but also many ingredients from conventional cleaning agents destroy marble. Only use cleaning agents specified by the manufacturer such as marble milk or other care sets for cleaning.

2. Beware of water! Make sure that there is no water on the worktop or window sills. Otherwise there are ugly stains and the marble can become matt on the spot. For example, place small doilies, like crocheted or knitted yourself, under the flower pots. Marble sinks should be wiped as quickly as possible after washing your hands.

Sabrina Deckert

Popular by topic