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Historic roses: nostalgic charm
Historic roses: nostalgic charm

Video: Historic roses: nostalgic charm

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Video: Historic Roses 2023, January
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Historic roses have been captivating garden lovers for centuries with delicate flowers, an intense fragrance and wonderful sounding names. In our guide you will learn interesting facts about the history and properties of historical roses. You will also receive tips on how to care for the special flower bushes in your garden.

Table of Contents Table of Contents Historic Roses: Nostalgic Charm

  • What are historical roses?
  • How do historical roses differ from modern ones?
  • Placement in the garden
  • Plant historical roses
  • The right care for old roses

Table of Contents Table of Contents Historic Roses: Nostalgic Charm

  • What are historical roses?
  • How do historical roses differ from modern ones?
  • Placement in the garden
  • Plant historical roses
  • The right care for old roses

What are historical roses?

The terms historical roses and old roses are used synonymously. They stand for rose classes that existed even before the first hybrid rose, the 'La France' tea hybrid from 1867. New varieties from these classes are also considered historical roses.

The oldest rose classes have existed for over 2, 000 years, such as the 'Gallica' - a robust wild rose. It is one of the popular historical roses and produces more colors than any other old class. Varieties of the Gallica rose often remain low, their shoots have only a few spines. Another historical rose is 'Damascus' (origin: Asia Minor), which has existed since ancient times and is known for its lovely fragrance. Their cultivation serves, among other things, the production of rose oil and rose water. The roughly the same old, white to soft pink blooming 'Alba' (origin: Asia Minor / Europe) was associated with purity in the Middle Ages and, like the 'Centifolia', has a stature height of up to two meters. The 500-year-old Centifolia rose blooms from white to pink to dark red and often has several hundred petals.

Tee-Rose in Dunkelrot
Tee-Rose in Dunkelrot

Tea roses were created in the 19th century. To see here: The variety 'Francis Dubreuil'.

Photo: Jens Schlueter / dpa-tmn

The Portland rose (origin: Italy), which originated from an autumn damask in 1800, was one of the first roses to bloom more often. The Bourbon (origin: France), Noisette (origin: United Kingdom), Tea (origin: France) and Remontant (origin: France) roses, also known as historical roses, were created in the 19th century by crossing with Chinese garden roses and already have many characteristics of modern roses. These rose varieties delight their owners with a subsequent bloom.

How do historical roses differ from modern ones?

While many modern rose varieties bloom until the first frost, many historical roses end after three to six weeks. For this, they bloom continuously in June / July and are almost wasteful for three to six weeks.

The color spectrum of historical roses is also limited: signal red, yellow, orange and salmon colors are only available with modern roses. Old roses enchant us with pastel-colored, white, pink-red or purple-red flowers. In addition, the flower shape is different: historical roses have a plate shape. The petals are usually softer, which means that their wonderful fragrance is exuded even more. In contrast to modern roses, historical roses grow more expansive and not infrequently to remarkable flowering shrubs. Their leaves are dull green, their flowers have shorter styles and usually sit closer to the long shoots than is the case with modern roses.

Historische Rose ‘Salet’
Historische Rose ‘Salet’

The historical rose 'Salet' is considered very healthy and robust.

Photo: Jens Schlueter / dpa-tmn

Placement in the garden

Whether as a single shrub, standard stem or hedge of flowers - historical roses need a place in the garden where they can fully develop their beauty. Their nostalgic charm is particularly evident alongside plants that support this effect, such as foxglove, columbine, clematis or bluebell. These plants bloom around the same time as the historical roses. For a wonderfully romantic atmosphere, it is better to rely on flowering perennials such as summer phlox and Indian nettle or on annual flowers such as levkoys and sweet peas - flowering breaks after the rose bloom can be cleverly played around.

When choosing a location, please also note that old roses need at least four hours of sun a day, an airy place in the garden and - with the exception of the Gallica rose and the Alba rose - don't tolerate poor soils. On the contrary: The soil at the planting site should be deep, loose, well-drained, rich in nutrients and humus. Sandy clay soils are perfectly suitable.

‘Madame Boll’
‘Madame Boll’

The 'Madame Boll' variety belongs to the Portland roses and is decorated with double, pink flowers.

Photo: Jens Schlueter / dpa-tmn

Plant historical roses

The ideal time to plant historical roses is in autumn - from mid-October to late November. They can still take root until winter and will sprout strongly in the next spring. In regions with rough winters or heavy soils, garden lovers can also plant their roses in spring as a precaution. Container roses can basically be planted all year round, provided the ground is not frozen.

How to proceed: First, dig out a planting hole. The hole should be approximately twice the size of the root ball. If you loosen the soil and the edges of the planting hole a little with a digging fork, the roots can penetrate into the adjacent soil more easily. If the soil is too lean, mix the excavation with some compost, if the soil is heavy, some sand increases the permeability. Cut the roots of bare-rooted roses back to about 20 to 30 centimeters and remove any injured or kinked sections. Then place them in water overnight (but at least two to three hours) so that the roots can completely soak up water. Before planting, container roses should only be immersed in water until there are no more bubbles.

Then put the rose in the planting hole. The finishing station should be about five centimeters above the ground. Then fill the hole with the excavation and firmly pound the earth. Finally, water the rose extensively.

‘Stanwell Perpetual’
‘Stanwell Perpetual’

'Stanwell Perpetual' is a historical rose, which was created by crossing Bibernell rose and autumn damascene.

Photo: Jens Schlueter / dpa-tmn

The right care for old roses

  • Basically, faded should also be removed regularly from historical roses. This is especially important for densely filled varieties.
  • In spring and July you should fertilize your historical roses with organic or slightly mineral rose fertilizer. As a result, the plants receive important nutrients, remain healthy and enjoy blooming.
  • You can do without regular watering. Thanks to their deep roots, historical roses provide themselves with enough water. On particularly hot summer days, however, they look forward to extra water. Our tip: Water rather rarely, but thoroughly. However, roses in a pot must be watered consistently.
  • Most historical roses are hardy, but the finishing point is often a bit sensitive. For this reason, you should pile the flower bushes in the root area with some soil before winter. In particularly cold regions, light winter protection in the form of pine twigs can also be advisable.
‘Versicolor’
‘Versicolor’

The oldest rose classes are over 2, 000 years old, such as Gallica roses, here the 'Versicolor' variety.

Photo: Jens Schlueter / dpa-tmn

Historical roses should not be cut too often - they do not grow very quickly and only develop their full bloom after two to three years. In the case of well-grown roses, however, old and rotten shoots should be cut off near the ground in autumn. You should only prune young shoots when the rose is out of shape or has grown too large. The right time for this is in summer.

‘Maiden’s Blush’
‘Maiden’s Blush’

A classic among the historical roses is the densely filled, over 500 year old variety 'Maiden's Blush'.

Photo: Jens Schlueter / dpa-tmn

Even historical roses are not immune to the typical rose diseases and are affected by fungal diseases such as mildew, star soot and rose rust. Plant pests such as aphids, spider mites or rose leafhoppers can also occur. Check your flower bushes regularly for an infestation. To prevent this, you can fortify the plants with a horsetail broth - this keeps them healthy and resistant.

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