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Viennese network: classic furniture rediscovered
Viennese network: classic furniture rediscovered
Anonim

Viennese braid transports the scorn of the Austrian capital and the associated cozy coffee shop flair into the new millennium. Because, as in fashion, every trend comes back at home. Not only because of its cozy elegance, the traditional yet timeless material is again very popular today, it also scores with exemplary sustainability. Find out everything about the origin, design and use of the iconic classic.

Table of contents Table of contents For a better view: furniture with Viennese weave

  • What is Viennese braid?
  • How is Viennese braid created?
  • The history of the Viennese network
  • Maintenance and repair of Viennese braid
  • Viennese braid today - the comeback of the classic

Table of contents Table of contents For a better view: furniture with Viennese weave

  • What is Viennese braid?
  • How is Viennese braid created?
  • The history of the Viennese network
  • Maintenance and repair of Viennese braid
  • Viennese braid today - the comeback of the classic

What is Viennese braid?

Viennese braid has a long history in furniture making. The traditional octagonal braiding pattern was already a real trendsetter in the 19th century. The permeable fabric was made by hand and bears its name because it was primarily found in Viennese coffee houses. It is therefore not surprising that the most famous representative is the classic coffee house chair, designed in 1859 by the Thonet brothers. The original with product number 14 (now 214) was sold more than 50 million times until 1930 alone.

How is Viennese braid created?

Classic Viennese braid is made from six interwoven rattan cane strands, a cane weave, also called rattan or rotang, which grows as a creeper in the tropical jungles of Indonesia. It is considered to be particularly strong and robust. For use as braid, the threads of the plant are peeled off the outer skin.

The Viennese network gets its shape and strength from its lattice-shaped basic structure, into which a stable and honeycomb-shaped lattice is braided using longitudinal, transverse and diagonal ties. The mats produced in this way are then clamped in the respective frame. The following applies: the more material is intertwined and the finer the distance between the holes, the higher the service life and quality. Because despite the low weight, Viennese mesh can even keep up with wood in terms of stability. Another plus: the rapidly growing rattan is one of the most sustainable fabrics in furniture construction.

The history of the Viennese network

Basketry is one of the oldest handicrafts - its beginnings go back to ancient times. Until the 17th century, mainly European materials such as willow, straw or bulrush were used in Europe. Due to the import of rattan furniture from Asia, the rattan palm of the rattan palm was added as a material. For braiding, the rattan material was first made soft, elastic and pliable under hot steam, and then used to cover chairs, fill cupboard doors and chest of drawers. The thick parts of the trunk were used for furniture racks, for example. Advantage: The so-called chair braided tube is more flexible than classic wood and therefore much more comfortable. Despite the airy look, it is very stable and resilient.

Viennese braid describes the special type of braiding with a pattern of six interwoven rattan cane strands. Already around 1780, at the time of Josephinism, the first chairs with the prominent honeycomb pattern appeared in Austria. In particular, the high seating comfort of the Viennese mesh is decisive for the fact that the use of the material is still very popular to this day.

In the course of industrialization, the spread of the Viennese network picked up again and became affordable for the general public. Even today, furniture made from Viennese mesh is manufactured by hand. Especially for the restoration of antique furniture, the special weaving technique is still very much in demand and is part of the basic knowledge of all basket and furniture weavers. In the meantime, industrial production has progressed so far that machine-made yard goods made of both natural material and plastic are even available in DIY stores for DIY projects.

Wanduhr mit Wiener Geflecht
Wanduhr mit Wiener Geflecht

A wall clock made of wicker is an eye-catcher in the living room.

Photo: living4media / Mondadori portfolio

Maintenance and repair of Viennese braid

Precisely because furniture covered with Viennese braid is so particularly robust, it is often used for decades and is passed on from generation to generation as a popular classic. So it is not surprising that after some wear and tear individual parts have to be refurbished or replaced. There is professional help from the manufacturer, as well as complete repair kits and instructions on the Internet.

So that the natural structure of the braid does not become brittle, dry heat, i.e. hot, dry and sunny and air-conditioned locations, should be avoided. The material, originally from the tropics, is used to a humid climate. In order to maintain its natural elasticity, it is often recommended to moisten the back regularly, for example with a cloth soaked in water.

For chairs that are exposed to heavy loads, Thonet has developed a new process in which a stable, transparent, barely visible mesh fabric is stretched under the natural cane. The furniture of this version is marked with the suffix "V" on the model number.

The light braid darkens over time and develops a beautiful natural patina. If it is dirty, it is sufficient to clean the Viennese mesh with a wet sponge or cloth.

Thonet Stuhl
Thonet Stuhl

A new, innovative process was developed by Thonet for chairs that are exposed to heavy loads. A barely visible, transparent mesh made of stable plastic is stretched under the natural cane.

Photo: living4media / Miguel Varanda

Viennese braid today - the comeback of the classic

After the trend of the past few years towards cooler materials such as marble or metal, we now wish for more warmth and security in our own four walls. No wonder that a traditional, classic design like that of the Viennese network is very popular again. Especially in times when sustainability is the number one topic, the natural, comparatively rapidly growing rattan of the Viennese network corresponds exactly to the spirit of the times. Added to this is the high-quality look, paired with elegant simplicity. This way, furniture with a Viennese weave can be integrated into any living style. Due to the slight transparency of the braid, the furniture never appears bulky, but brings lightness into the room.

Sideboard mit Wiener Geflecht
Sideboard mit Wiener Geflecht

Start photo gallery

Leuchten mit Wiener Geflecht
Leuchten mit Wiener Geflecht
Schrank aus Wiener Geflecht
Schrank aus Wiener Geflecht
Schrank aus Wiener Geflecht
Schrank aus Wiener Geflecht

6 Show all Furniture with Viennese weave

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Scandinavian cosiness is created by the right measure of modern and at the same time cozy pieces of furniture.

Photo: WestwingNow.de

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Ideal for luminaires: rattan weave lets enough light through and at the same time creates a warm and inviting atmosphere.

Photo: WestwingNow.de

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Wardrobes made of Viennese mesh are always eye-catchers as solitaires.

Photo: otto.de

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The look becomes noble and simple when combined with wood and light natural nuances. Black accents add some excitement.

Photo: otto.de

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Paravents made of Viennese mesh are transparent and yet perfect for shielding.

Photo: westwingnow.de

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The backrest made of Viennese mesh of the “Hideout” armchair looks like a generous hug.

Photo: gebruederthonetvienna.com

Sideboard mit Wiener Geflecht
Sideboard mit Wiener Geflecht
Leuchten mit Wiener Geflecht
Leuchten mit Wiener Geflecht
Schrank aus Wiener Geflecht
Schrank aus Wiener Geflecht
Schrank aus Wiener Geflecht
Schrank aus Wiener Geflecht
Paravent mit Wiener Geflecht
Paravent mit Wiener Geflecht
Sessel „Hideout“
Sessel „Hideout“

Nina Bemmann

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