Table of contents:

Easter customs in Germany and worldwide
Easter customs in Germany and worldwide
Video: Easter customs in Germany and worldwide
Video: Top 10 Unique Easter Traditions Around The World 2023, February
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The days are noticeably longer, the air is pleasantly mild again for the first time: Spring is coming and needs to be celebrated - today just as it was more than 2, 000 years ago. At that time the Teutons were so happy about the end of winter that they celebrated a festival in honor of their spring goddess Ostara on the first spring full moon. The Christians adopted it as a celebration of Christ's resurrection.

Table of contents Table of contents Easter customs in Germany and worldwide

  • The Easter Bunny
  • The easteregg
  • Easter customs in Europe
  • Easter customs in the UK
  • Easter in Scandinavia
  • Easter customs in the United States
  • Easter customs in Mexico
  • Easter in South America
  • Easter customs in Africa
  • Easter in the islands
  • Easter in Australia

Table of contents Table of contents Easter customs in Germany and worldwide

  • The Easter Bunny
  • The easteregg
  • Easter customs in Europe
  • Easter customs in the UK
  • Easter in Scandinavia
  • Easter customs in the United States
  • Easter customs in Mexico
  • Easter in South America
  • Easter customs in Africa
  • Easter in the islands
  • Easter in Australia

The Easter Bunny

The main character of the German Easter festival cannot be photographed or caught. Nevertheless, parents, in particular, could swear that the Easter bunny was stuck in their way - who else should put colored eggs, gummy bears and chocolate in the nests that children put in the garden on Easter Saturday? So far, it has also not been clarified whether the hard-working bumblebee lays the eggs himself and paints them with his own feet - or simply collects and colors the chicken product. What is certain, however, is the fact that the Easter bunny has only been doing his job for 300 years. Before that he was helped by the crane and stork, fox and lamb and the sky hen.

In early Christians, the hare was a symbol of pagans who could be converted. For us, rabbits, eggs and spring announce fertility and a new zest for life, and we celebrate Easter with Easter customs, with family and friends.

Osterhase
Osterhase

The Easter bunny is known to hide the Easter eggs.

Photo: living4media / Biglife

The easteregg

Eggs also express friendship - hiding, searching and eating them is as much a part of Easter as Easter. If you take it exactly, you do without eggs during Lent. In the past, the fresh clutch was preserved by boiling and colored with plant parts; This was how the boiled eggs could be distinguished from the raw ones. It is fun to paint the eggs long before Easter. Traditionally, however, people only sit together on Easter Saturday, fill them with ham and bread in baskets and have them consecrated in the church on Sunday.

Easter customs in Europe

French Easter tradition

In France, people hug and kiss as soon as the Easter chime rings.

Easter in Austria and Switzerland

One of the Easter customs of our Alpine neighbors, in Austria and Switzerland, is egg pecking, beating hard-boiled eggs together - whose shell breaks, it has lost.

Easter in Italy

On Sundays in Italy you eat an Easter cake, a spicy pastry with boiled eggs and spinach. On Easter Monday, the whole of Italy is on its feet for an Easter trip. The Greek Orthodox Easter begins one week after our celebration. On Thursday you dye red Easter eggs, which you only eat on Saturday.

Easter customs in Moldova

For Christians in Moldova, Easter is the holiest day of the year. The traditions and Easter customs are like ours - even the Easter bunny has been around for a few years. Easter is celebrated with red eggs and lamb, for dessert there is sweet bread with cheese or cake. The red eggs symbolize the blood of Christ, the lamb is said to bring happiness, wealth and joy.

Ostereier rot
Ostereier rot

Red colored Easter eggs are a tradition in several countries.

Photo: living4media / Martina Schindler

Easter customs in the UK

Tradition in England

The English collect pussy willows and pat each other with the branches - this Easter custom is said to bring good luck for the next year.

Easter in Ireland

Symbolic herring funerals take place in Ireland - for the joy of the end of the strict Lent, when you were only allowed to eat fish.

Easter customs in Scotland

The Scots are catching Easter fires on the hills of the Highlands, the Easter customs come from the spring festivals of the Celts.

Easter in Scandinavia

Finnish Easter customs

The Finns gently beat themselves on the back with birch branches - following the palm fronds with which Jesus was greeted when he entered Jerusalem. Finnish children roam the streets with loud noise on Easter Sunday and chase away the winter.

Easter in Sweden

Swedish apartments are decorated with birch branches and colorful feather bushes according to Easter customs. On Holy Thursday, girls and boys dress up as Easter women with long skirts and head scarves: they move from house to house, distribute blessings on Easter letters and solicit sweets.

Schwedische Kinder verkleiden sich als Osterweiber
Schwedische Kinder verkleiden sich als Osterweiber

In Sweden, "Easter women", dressed as children, move around the houses and ask for sweets.

Photo: iStock / TiinaKoo

Easter customs in the United States

In the USA, Easter is celebrated like ours - painting with Easter eggs, Easter bunny and worship. In New York on Easter Sunday, flowered floats roll along Fifth Avenue for the traditional Easter parade, and for over a century, egg rolling in a meadow in front of the government building in Washington has been an Easter tradition. Each participant is rewarded with a wooden egg, signed by the President and the First Lady.

Easter customs in Mexico

Easter in Mexico is like a colorful fair. Garlands of crepe and toilet paper adorn the streets for two weeks and men with Indian headdresses dance through the alleys. It is customary to burn paper mache dolls on Easter Sunday. They are supposed to symbolize the victory of good over evil. But mostly not only demons or devils burn, but also some hated politicians.

Easter in South America

Besides Christmas, Easter is the most important festival in South America. The colonial masters brought the Easter customs along with the Christian faith to the continent. The Semana Santa is celebrated for a whole week. It usually starts on Palm Sunday and continues until Easter Sunday. Most people are free to roam the streets, celebrate, and eat traditional dishes.

Easter customs in Peru

In Peru, the holy week is characterized by festive clothing and numerous processions. In all possible places, drinks and dishes are celebrated and the streets of some cities are decorated with millions of petals. Children make small Juda dolls and burn them when it gets dark. Peace only comes on Good Friday: a soup of fish, potatoes and seafood is eaten in silence. Easter Saturday it is all the more colorful.

Osterumzug in Peru
Osterumzug in Peru

During the "Semana santa", Holy Week, countless processions with colorfully dressed people move through the Peruvian cities.

Photo: iStock / Mauro_Repossini

Easter customs in Africa

Easter customs in Egypt

Easter is also celebrated in Egypt, but only by a small minority, the Copts. The day after Easter, our Easter Sunday, the whole country celebrates the Sham al-Naseem festival. With this ancient, pharaonic festival, the return of spring is celebrated - you have colorful eggs for breakfast and eat salty fish in the park.

Easter in Ethiopia

Most people in Ethiopia are also Christians. Accordingly, Easter is also celebrated here: it goes to church. It is elaborately decorated and decorated. After the church visit there is a big party with the whole family. Easter customs include gifts here. Almost as many gifts are given as at Christmas. Unlike us, the children do not paint and hide eggs, but go from house to house and distribute fresh grass at the doors as a sign of life and resurrection.

Easter traditions in Zambia

Almost all people in Zambia are Christians. Easter therefore plays a major role here. Apart from visiting the church, there are no special rituals. Over the entire Easter days you meet with family, friends and acquaintances and celebrate a big party in colorful clothing.

Easter in the islands

In Haiti, artful, brightly colored dragons soar in the air on Good Friday. The children have been looking forward to the day for months and have made beautiful kites out of everything - plastic, sticks, threads. The Easter Raras roam the streets, trying to call evil demons from the house of a magician, a houngan, with tin drums and other noisy objects. They are accompanied by dancers and acrobats. The spectacle ends on Easter Sunday with a feast.

Easter customs in the Philippines

In the Philippines, the children are grabbed by the head at Easter and lifted up. The children should grow faster. Easter bunnies and painted eggs are also Easter customs. The re-enactment of Christ's crucifixion on the Karfreitung is more martial: Arch-Catholic men are nailed to the cross after a procession through the streets. The Catholic Church criticizes this bloody ritual.

Osterbrauch auf den Philippinen
Osterbrauch auf den Philippinen

In the Philippines, the Passion of Christ is reproduced very vividly and realistically.

Photo: iStock / uba-foto

Easter in Australia

Just like with us, the Easter holidays in Australia begin on Ash Wednesday with a 40-day Lent. The day before Ash Wednesday, the Pancake Day, pancakes are stuffed again so that the time until Holy Thursday, our Maundy Thursday, can be overcome. Easter customs also include coloring, painting and hiding eggs.

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